Tagged: arachnid

I want to be somebody’s buddy

Today, I bought some fresh lavender at the market, because fresh lavender is probably one of the best things in the universe, and also it was on sale, so that was pretty much inarguable. When I got home, I discovered that I had apparently purchased a small friend in addition to fresh flowers.

Crab Spider
Crab Spider

This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae). They’re ambush predators who hide around fruit and flowers, waiting to nab visiting insects.

I am not sure how much prey he’s going to manage to catch inside my apartment, so I’m letting him go outside, even though I was pretty excited to find him.

Photo Details
Konica Minolta Pro Automatic 35mm F2.8 Lens reverse-mounted with 20mm extension tube on a Canon T1i Rebel
ISO 100 at f/22, 1/100 sec
Diffuse flash in whitebox
Image editing in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Big Damn Spider

Wolf Spider
Wolf Spider

I believe that this is Hogna helluo, although I am by no means a spider expert. I found her while I was out trying to shoot some Acris this evening … which didn’t really work out as well as I hoped, but as long as I get something good out of it, I’m not complaining.

Edit: This is indeed H. helluo, at least according to my highly knowledgeable office mate whose dissertation work is on these spiders.

Photo Details
Tamron 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro Lens on a Canon T1i Rebel
ISO 100 at f/16, 1/100 sec
Diffuse flash in whitebox
Image editing in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Baby Salticid

I am pretty sure that this jumping spider spiderling (or maybe just a jumping spiderling?) is the smallest thing I’ve ever taken a picture of.

Jumping Spider
Jumping Spider

Photo Details

Konica Minolta Pro Automatic 35mm F2.8 Lens reverse-mounted with 36mm extension tube on a Canon T1i Rebel
ISO 100 at f/22, 1/160 sec
Diffuse flash in whitebox
Image editing in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Fort Worth Botanic Garden: Fauna

Today, I went to the Fort Worth Botanic Garden. If you are ever in or around Fort Worth, this is a place you should go. It is full of plants, and almost all of the gardens there are free (except for the Japanese Garden, where you have to pay $4.50 to get in, and the amazing indoor conservatory, which will cost you a dollar, and is totally worth it). It’s also a great place for bug watching, since the flowers draw a lot of interesting pollinators, and they have a lot of diverse, arthropod friendly habitat. It’s also apparently not a bad place for city herping, since I heard some calling cricket frogs and spotted two green anoles and a blotched water snake while wandering through the gardens. (They’ve also got red-eared sliders everywhere, but turtles are not exciting herpetofauna, so I wasn’t that excited to see them.)

All in all, it was a pretty great day.

Bridge in the Japanese Garden
Bridge in the Japanese Garden

I could not take a landscape photo to save my life. Fortunately for all of us, that’s not why you’re here. (I hope.)

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