Herpetology Class Trips

This semester, I’m taking a herpetology class. It’s a lot of fun — I get to actually learn about amphibians, and the class has a lab and field component that I’m really enjoying. Part of my final grade will be based on how well I keep a field notebook — and while writing down substrate temperatures quickly gets boring (there’s a reason I’m not an ecologist, dammit), the plus side is that occasionally, there are things like snakes and frogs in my life.

For example, on Labor Day, I wandered down to the southeastern corner of the state with my lab mates, and while the herping wasn’t great, we did manage to find this wonderful Great Plains Ratsnake (Pantherophis emoryi) hiding under a rock near the side of the road.

Great Plains Ratsnake
Great Plains Ratsnake

Yesterday, our whole class piled into a couple of vans, and we hit Schramm State Recreation Area. With thirty eyes fixed on the ground, we managed to find some pretty cool stuff — including a young Eastern Racer (Coluber constrictor) caught in the act of eating a neonate Common Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis).

Racer eating a Garter Snake
Racer eating a Garter Snake

I admit it’s not my best photo ever (super natural background, eh?) but that’s just cool.

Other finds included large numbers of Blanchard’s Cricket Frog (Acris crepitans blanchardi), a juvenile male Northern Water Snake (Nerodia sipedon), adult Common Garter Snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis), Plains Leopard Frogs (Lithobates blairi), a young Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) — an invasive species in Nebraska, and, finally, a pair of young Cope’s Grey Tree Frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis), who were hanging out in the park restrooms (cool, damp, and full of insects!) — here’s a portrait of one on a slightly more natural background.

Cope's Grey Tree Frog
Cope’s Grey Tree Frog

2 comments

  1. M. Barton

    I admit it’s not my best photo ever (super natural background, eh?) but that’s just cool.

    I actually like it because your hand (or whoever’s hand that is) gives such a clear idea of how small both snakes are. Plus DRAMA.

    • Lee

      I know, So dramatic, right? I love how the littler guy is clinging to anything he can (i.e. sticks and the other snake) to make it as difficult as possible for the racer to eat him.

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